Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: A Little Help?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Tiwaz- It is a narrative reason. They came across an injured elf who with his dying plea asked them to prevent the ogres from obtaining the Heart of the Irda. Your idea of an NPC prompt to get them back on track of the main quest would work well if I need it. One of the players is a disguised Irda with a pearl earring that allows her to send messages to her mentor. Its supposed to be a one way system of communication, but the player hasn't been remembering to send messages to her mentor, so maybe making it able to send and receive messages, maybe when Solinari is full, is an idea.

    Weldon- Speaking of the PoC, my original idea was to take the KoD, SoS and PoC and tweak them to fit in with my campaign. Obviously that'd take quite a bit of work, but I really would like to run a group through those modules and I have no plans to ever have Chaos appear or have an Age of Mortals etc. so to run them will require a lot of work. Also, I *loved* the original Wing Commander.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    607

    Default

    The key to understanding and eliminating railroad plots is to make your players actions have a consequence.

    An actual railroad would be that no matter what the players do, any future event is the same.

    Giving the players agency and ensuring their decisions alter the game means it is not a railroad.

    The easiest way to understand this is to think of a scenario where the party encounters someone guarding a door. The parties goal is to get past the door and get information from someone in the next room.

    How the party gets past the guard and door should affect what happens in the next room. IE, if the party uses Diplomacy to get the guard to open the door and introduce them to the person in the next room, what happens in the next room would be different than if the party killed the guard and smashed the door to get into the next room.

    For your game, you can have a future NPC mention that he knew someone the party killed and wants information on it. Or you can have some side quest that the party skipped be brought up as becoming a world consequence since it wasn't completed.

    The party heard rumors about some strange happenings at a nearby village. They bypassed the village to follow the main plot and the direction of the ring. They talk to an NPC later and find out that the village was raided by goblins and burned to the ground.

    Small details like this having a consequence bring the world to life and directly tie your player's actions to a consequence. You can even invert it, the players did the side quest, so the next boss had more time to recruit new units to protect himself. As the party moves towards their next destination, they see old notices of someone hiring mercenaries. There are new defensive fortifications built and the new recruits have been training. The parties decision to delay on the main quest has a consequence that their goal is now harder to achieve.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    327

    Default

    The main thing about the railroading is that I feel that is seems too obvious, what with the magical ring pointing the party in the direction of the next item they need to collect to finally get ahold of the Heart. I was trying to tie my campaign ideas into the AoM modules that way. Find the Shard, find the Dragonlance, find the dragon skulls which would then lead them to the Heart of the Irda. Now I'm worried that the party might get tired of being led around by a ring for so long a period of time. There has not been any hint of that being the case yet, I am just thinking ahead.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    5,396

    Default

    Have you ever tried to follow a compass literally? Have that ring drag them through awful, difficult stuff. It's not a railroad if they have to problem-solve their way through it.
    Dragonlanceforums.com Moderater - To be one, ask one!

    Do you love the Dragonlace Forums? Do they provide you with hours of entertainment? Why not donate? Keep the hamsters running. Ask me how!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaithan Kanathar View Post
    The main thing about the railroading is that I feel that is seems too obvious, what with the magical ring pointing the party in the direction of the next item they need to collect to finally get ahold of the Heart. I was trying to tie my campaign ideas into the AoM modules that way. Find the Shard, find the Dragonlance, find the dragon skulls which would then lead them to the Heart of the Irda. Now I'm worried that the party might get tired of being led around by a ring for so long a period of time. There has not been any hint of that being the case yet, I am just thinking ahead.
    You have a misconception of railroading.

    An actual railroad involving the ring would be that the ring tells them where to go, then teleports them to the location. The players are given no choice in the matter.

    Non-railroad would be the ring tells them the location. The players choose to go there and there is a consequence for how they travel. IE, they take the long way, "You arrive and see recently built fortifications. If only you had traveled faster to get here." They travel as fast as possible, "You see them attempting to recruit and just starting to build new defenses. It is a good thing you rapidly traveled here." The world is now different based on their choice. That is not a railroad.

    You also have to remember a couple things as a DM. You built a campaign for the players to complete. That campaign has specific events in mind for them to encounter and overcome. That is not a railroad. That is the point of the campaign. You have chosen a method of imparting information to your players, the ring. That method is not a railroad. Would it be different if they found diaries or talked to NPCs and got information on where to go? No, its all the same. The players learn where to go. The players then choose to go there. You need those key events to actually have a campaign. Otherwise you have a sporadic set of random encounters with no overall plot.

    As long as their is always a consequence for your player's choices, there is no railroad.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •