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Thread: DL Author We Have a Question For You

  1. #1
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    Default DL Author We Have a Question For You

    RAK,

    I have always wondered where your love for writing about minotaurs came from? It appears that you have a particular fondness for this race!!
    Let me be the goblin. Pleeasssse Flint let me. GOBLIN!!! -Tas-

  2. #2
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    Chris Pierson,

    Why is it that the kender in your novels tend to be darker, or twisted? (for example, afflicted kender, shaddow kender). It's something I've wondered for a while.
    "I'm a kender. I'm not stupid. This is stupid." - Nightshade Pricklypear

  3. #3
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    Jeff Sampson or YR Author,

    Sindri Suncatcher question.

    Well since it is commonly known that kenders do not possess magic. How did you have the courage to buck the system and create such a facinating character?
    Let me be the goblin. Pleeasssse Flint let me. GOBLIN!!! -Tas-

  4. #4
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    Also a Sindri question:

    Why is it that if Sindri possesses the magic of dragons that he can only manipulate the elements (that is if this doesn't give the plot away for the next novel)?
    "I'm a kender. I'm not stupid. This is stupid." - Nightshade Pricklypear

  5. #5
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    Oh yay a question for me.

    I didn't create Sindri, Tim Waggoner did. And I didn't give him magic, that was Dan Willis in The Dragon Well. I just took it upon myself to explain why he had magic within this setting, and actually at first they were wary of me doing a Sindri trilogy because of the reception Sindri got from adult series fans and writers. But I told them my ideas and sold them on the trilogy. It wasn't brave so much as I thought I had a neat idea and I liked the challenge of trying to connect Sindri to the overall setting, as well as make sure all his plot threads from other books got pulled together.

    As for Sindri's magic, it's similar to the magic the dragons possess, but it's not the same. I don't think it really spoils the plot to clarify that Sindri is not a wizard and is, in fact, a wild magic user; that is, within this setting he'd be considered a sorcerer. The last book of Suncatcher trilogy explains how this happened, but that's why his magic is so specific. For instance, whenever I had him use what a mage would call Feather Fall, I made a point of describing the air itself changing to slow his descent rather than magic stopping him specifically from falling. He can manipulate the world around people and objects, not the people and objects themselves. It's just the way his magic works.
    jeffsampsonbooks.com

    DRAGONLANCE: THE NEW ADVENTURES
    Vol. 8: Dragon Spell
    Trinistyr Trilogy, Vol. 2: Wizard's Betrayal
    The Suncacther Trilogy

  6. #6
    cpierson Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devyn
    Chris Pierson,

    Why is it that the kender in your novels tend to be darker, or twisted? (for example, afflicted kender, shaddow kender). It's something I've wondered for a while.
    It's really just an accident of circumstances. I think. In Spirit of the Wind, the whole premise of the book revolved around the kender's loss of their homeland. I just took that and ran with it. In the Taladas books, the kender of Marak are already kind of screwed up in the setting; I just pushed them over the edge.

    Well, it's not really that simple, I guess. When I decided the Brethren's servants needed to be corrupted, rather than just conjured from the Abyss or whatnot, I asked myself -- who's particularly innocent, that it would be crueller for these evil bastards to corrupt? And who's isolated enough that people might not notice for a while? And hey, presto: kender.

    Of course, corruption's a major theme in my books. Kendermore in Spirit, the centaurs and Grimbough in Dezra's Quest, Kurnos and Beldinas and Istar itself in the Kingpriest books, and a lot of stuff, from Chovuk to the shadow-kender to ... well, other things ... in the Taladas books. But then, it's a major theme in a lot of fantasy, from Darth Vader to the One Ring to Voldemort's servants to just about everything in the Dark Tower. So I'm hardly alone in my fascination with it.

  7. #7
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    to Chris Pierson


    Love the Taladas trilogy any chance of more books getting set there????
    Last edited by pyrite07; 06-05-2007 at 01:36 PM.

  8. #8
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    Thanks, Chris,

    I do have another question roughly related to that last subject. Is there any chance that you, or any other author to your knowledge, might continue with the afflicted kender storyline?
    "I'm a kender. I'm not stupid. This is stupid." - Nightshade Pricklypear

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Sampson
    Oh yay a question for me.

    I didn't create Sindri, Tim Waggoner did. And I didn't give him magic, that was Dan Willis in The Dragon Well. I just took it upon myself to explain why he had magic within this setting, and actually at first they were wary of me doing a Sindri trilogy because of the reception Sindri got from adult series fans and writers. But I told them my ideas and sold them on the trilogy. It wasn't brave so much as I thought I had a neat idea and I liked the challenge of trying to connect Sindri to the overall setting, as well as make sure all his plot threads from other books got pulled together.

    As for Sindri's magic, it's similar to the magic the dragons possess, but it's not the same. I don't think it really spoils the plot to clarify that Sindri is not a wizard and is, in fact, a wild magic user; that is, within this setting he'd be considered a sorcerer. The last book of Suncatcher trilogy explains how this happened, but that's why his magic is so specific. For instance, whenever I had him use what a mage would call Feather Fall, I made a point of describing the air itself changing to slow his descent rather than magic stopping him specifically from falling. He can manipulate the world around people and objects, not the people and objects themselves. It's just the way his magic works.

    Thanks this explains alot to me now. Unfortunantly I now have to go back and reread book 1 and 2 now. Oh well they are good reads.
    Let me be the goblin. Pleeasssse Flint let me. GOBLIN!!! -Tas-

  10. #10

    Default

    Concernng the question about minotaurs, I've been fascinated about them since first reading Greek mythology. When I discovered that there was a whole race of them on Krynn, I though, how different from most fantasy. I read that they were supposed to be beasts, yet they were supposed to have a rich civilization. Once I started delving into them, it just steamrolled...or bulldozed.

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