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Raistlin M.
09-17-2004, 06:09 PM
Before I try out the D&D roleplaying game I would like to ask a question. Is this game more than imagination or does it become real in a sense? Thanks for all your help in advance.

libra_sword
09-17-2004, 06:16 PM
Totally imaginary. The only thing that is real is the fun you have from playing in a totally fantasy world created by normal human beings.

WildKnight
09-17-2004, 06:24 PM
Before I try out the D&D roleplaying game I would like to ask a question. Is this game more than imagination or does it become real in a sense? Thanks for all your help in advance.

Thats kind of a broad question... does it become real in a sense? To me, any RPG, D&D or otherwise, is about the characters. I love to role-play, which means (for me) getting inside the heads of my characters and thinking about them as more than a set of stats on paper. On the other hand, I've never actually thought I *was* one of my characters, or spent time away from the table anguishing over my characters future survival.

I like the story-telling I do (I DM more often than play) to be immersive... I feel successful when my players identify with and care about the setting, the story, their characters, and the NPCs their characters have met. But that doesnt mean that it ever stops being imaginary. Ive heard of, but have never met, any of the nutjob over-the-top type players who non-gamers seem to like to imagine we all are.

The Grimace
09-17-2004, 06:36 PM
Thats kind of a broad question... does it become real in a sense? To me, any RPG, D&D or otherwise, is about the characters. I love to role-play, which means (for me) getting inside the heads of my characters and thinking about them as more than a set of stats on paper. On the other hand, I've never actually thought I *was* one of my characters, or spent time away from the table anguishing over my characters future survival.

I like the story-telling I do (I DM more often than play) to be immersive... I feel successful when my players identify with and care about the setting, the story, their characters, and the NPCs their characters have met. But that doesnt mean that it ever stops being imaginary. Ive heard of, but have never met, any of the nutjob over-the-top type players who non-gamers seem to like to imagine we all are.
I totally agree with your sentiments, Wildknight. Basically, my thoughts on the suject are that you should totally understand that the game is imaginary, but try to think of your world as real...does that make sense? When you read a good book, you like it because you have a connection to the world and the characters...that's what playing D&D should be about.

WildKnight
09-17-2004, 06:57 PM
I totally agree with your sentiments, Wildknight. Basically, my thoughts on the suject are that you should totally understand that the game is imaginary, but try to think of your world as real...does that make sense? When you read a good book, you like it because you have a connection to the world and the characters...that's what playing D&D should be about.

Couldnt have said it better myself (tried and failed as a matter of fact).

Cam Banks
09-17-2004, 07:00 PM
As roleplaying is in between the role of an actor in a play and the writer of a novel, there's often an investment in the character. But it's only as real as a character in a play or novel, and the investment is like that of anything you create and enjoy. In no sense are you becoming or transforming or anything else of that nature.

Cheers,
Cam

BobSutan
09-18-2004, 01:55 AM
For me, I have a ranger who's very real in the sense that its my actual personality coming through when we play. It some cases you might have to act in a way you normally wouldn't, but that's all of playing an RPG. In a sense you're pretty much acting out a character in the same way a film or theater actor would. Only difference is that instead props and CGI and all that fun stuff, all the action of the RPG takes place in your head.

If you need something physical to to look at, as some people do, they've got all sorts of minitures you can use for strategy, character representation, etc.

In the end its all make-believe. But its more real to me than say, watching a movie, mainly because I'm part of the story instead of a gawking bystander just watching it unfold infront of me on a piece of glass.

Nived
09-18-2004, 11:54 AM
In monopoly you don't really buy realestate and in D&D you don't really swing swords OR cast spells.

It's not real, none of it is real. There is no monsters, there is no magic. This is all pretend.